Site Brussels: Military Hospital, Bruynstreet 200, 1120 Brussels tel:+32(0)22644097 Fax:+32(0)22644098 (Roadplan)

Site Ghent: Dr. Guislain museum, Jozef Guislainstraat 43, 9000 Ghent (Roadplan)

The Belgian Museum of Radiology was established in 1990 in the corridors of the radiology department of the military hospital in Brussels. According to a survey conducted in "Science Museum" in London with 40,000 visitors , it seems that the most important discovery of the 19th century is radiology ! Remember also that radiology is used in many fields different from medicine . It is a fact that due to  to the radiology, more than 30 Nobel Laureates have gained their prizes with the practical implementation of this technology. In the world, museums of radiology are rather rare.

In 1997, our section of neuroradiology was transferred to the Museum of Psychiatry "Dr. Guislain" in Ghent.

Currently we have a site in Brussels and another in Ghent. Guided tours are availble in both locations (on demand)!

A nonprofit association , called ASKLEPIOS, supports activities whom are organized on regular periods by museum volunteers. 2015 was the  year  of 25th anniversary of our museum. We wish you an instructive visit to this site because you are the best ambassador to promote the museum. We count on you to join our organisation. We are looking forward te hear from you!

Last modif: 09 May 2017.

Books:1651

Objects:1109

Contact us:

info@radiology-museum.be 

Belgian museum of Radiology

Military Hospital
rue Bruynstraat 200
1120 Brussel - Bruxelles 

Tel: +32(0)22644097

Fax:+32(0)22644098

 

Bank:

BNP Paribas Fortis
IBAN BE18 0012 6341 2165

BIC: GEBABEBB

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Historical overview

 

 HistoricalAHistoryB

 

Room dedicated to Prof Mrs Röntgen

Professor Röntgen discovered the existence of X-rays on November 8 , 1895 through experiments in his laboratory in Würzburg. After 6 weeks of further experiments he invited his wife to his laboratory on the evening of December 22nd and demonstrated to her how a photo of her left hand looked like after radiation. The invention and properties of x-rays were carefully described and officially published on December 28,1895 In the "WÜRZBURG ROOM" we reconstruct the evening of December 22nd and show the equipment used for the "radiography" of Mrs Röntgen's left hand.

1 * a vacuum pump with a mercury pressure indicator connected to
2 * the X-ray generating device , itself connected to
3 * electrical power bobbin
4 * Mrs Röntgen's hand
5 * the fluorescent screen
6 * the picture of the hand on a photographic plate

Also shown is the first page of Röntgen's report of his experiments and a camera used to make pictures and provide evidence of the X-ray device he had invented.

 



HistoricalBHistoryB

Room dedicated to Prof J. Cornelis.(Neuro-radiologist UCL/KUL)

Professor Cornelis headed the neuro-radiology department in the academic hospital of the university of Louvain in the nineteen sixties. In addition to images of the skull taken from different angles, a large number of tomographs were produced with the "Polytome", an instrument developed by Philips. With the injection of contrasting agents such as "Lipidiol ®" images could be produced of the spinal marrow (myelographs), the brain( encephalographs) and arteries(arteriographs). A built in cassette device developed by the firm De Man allowed an easy switch of the radiographic parameters to optimise the imaging of different tissu

Vit123Vit1-2-3

Showcase 1 2 3

Röntgen - The beginning - Radioprotection



Vit45Vit4-5

Showcase 4 5

X-ray tubes    In search of the thirth dimension

 

Vit67Vit6-7

 

Showcase 6 7

First Belgian Publications   Beginning of neuroradiology in Belgium



vit8910Vit9-8-10

 

Showcase 8 9 10

Computer tomography   Ultrasound   Magnetic resonance

 

 

 

EarlyEarlyday

 

Early Days

This widely-distributed "Art-Nouveau" model, elaborated by A-J. D'Arsonval, (France, 1851-1940) and manufactured by G. Gaiffe (France 1857-1943) enjoyed an excellent reputation and over the years underwent a number of improvements. Here, it's shown with the famous Rochefort high voltage coil at the top of the device supplied by alternating current through a mercury and gas atmosphere turbine at the bottom. At the top, 2 Villard gas valve tubes (rectifier) were placed; later replaced by the hot cathode valve tube or Kenotron developed in 1914 by S. Dushman (USA, 1883-1954) of GE's researched laboratory. After 1915, the addition of a filament transformer enabled the case of the new powerful vacuum W. Coolidges tubes(USA, 1873 -1975). d'Arsonval apparatus with Oudin's resonator : High frequency instruments are constructed along two principal types - that of d'Arsonval and that of Tesla - with in connection or combination with them, a third instrument, the resonator of Oudin.

 

 

ConvTomoConvTomography

Conventional Tomography

Universal tomograph (origine Massiot France). This tomograph had a posterior version when the production Massiot became Philips Medical System. In a iron sheet construction this table was lighter than the first one (1947) in Holster, with a mass of 2500 kg! Professor Cornelis had the same equipment. He headed the neuro-radiology department in the academic hospital of the university of Louvain in the nineteen sixties. In addition to images of the skull taken from different angles, a large number of tomographs were produced with the "Polytome", an instrument developed by Philips. With the injection of contrasting agents such as "Lipiodol ® " images could be produced of the spinal marrow (myelographs), the brain (encephalographs) and arteries (arteriographs). A built in cassette device developed by the firm De Man allowed an easy switch of the radiographic parameters to optimise the imaging of different tissues. Note that in those days radiographic pictures were developed manually.

 

 

CtomoCTomography

 

Computed Tomography

In the museum we display the first scanner (the sixth in the world) installed in 1974 in Belgium (city of Charleroi) in professor M.COLLARD's ( 1934 - ) department (ULB). A computer is used to store the subsequent tomographic images, improve or color the images electronically and reproduce the images in sequence afterwards. It results in in-depth images of the various body tissues allowing the diagnosis of lesions and the follow-up of applied medication and treatments. Linking computer and tomograph was achieved during the research work, carried out in the seventies in England by G.HOUNSFIELD and A.CORMACK. Their work was sponsored by the firm E.M.I., producer of the very successful records of the "Beatles". The computer had been developed during World War II for deciphering the coded messages of the German and Japanese armies.

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